23 7 / 2014

oldfilmsflicker:

Book-Cut Artworks by Thomas Allen

via fer1972

SO COOL

(via nonnonmodernist)

11 7 / 2014

pewinternet:

The Fact Tank Chart of the Week: A new U.S. Census Bureau interactive explores the relationship between college majors & occupations.
Noteworthy: More engineering majors are non-STEM managers (18%) than computer workers (15%). And only about 26% of physical-sciences majors work in any STEM occupation at all; their biggest employment categories are health care (17%), non-STEM managerial jobs (14%) and education (12%). 

pewinternet:

The Fact Tank Chart of the Week: A new U.S. Census Bureau interactive explores the relationship between college majors & occupations.

Noteworthy: More engineering majors are non-STEM managers (18%) than computer workers (15%). And only about 26% of physical-sciences majors work in any STEM occupation at all; their biggest employment categories are health care (17%), non-STEM managerial jobs (14%) and education (12%). 

09 7 / 2014

Practice Inversion.  Identify an organizational practice you’ve initiated.  Answer the following four questions:

  1. What do you intend to achieve by instituting that practice?  What’s the reasoning behind it?
  2. What’s omitted from your understanding of the practice? What are the contradictions in your understanding of how the practice works? Which views and interpretations are unrepresented in your framing of the practice?
  3. Who benefits from the practice and who is harmed by it? Why do you not recognize those who are harmed?
  4. How could the practice be reinvented to be fairer, more effective, more inclusive or more justified by our mission?

— From Engaging Imagination by Stephen Brookfield & Alison James.

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Brookfield & James argue that a teacher who asks students to do this should model the process themselves — a good example of a “practice” would be an assignment, but it’s also easy to see how many classroom practices would be interestingly examined with this framework.  

And I think there’s a LOT about research practice that would be usefully examined this way.  Both things we like and think are important as well as things we’re not so sure of.  I think it would be interesting to examine things like source requirements, for example, against these questions and particularly interesting to hear what we’d come up with for #4.

09 7 / 2014

"Publishing and labor are two of academia’s most contentious issues, and they are usually debated separately. But when the rate of contingency hires and publications rise together—with the assumption that the latter is a means to avoid the former—they need to be taken as a broader problem: the self-defeating mechanization of scholarship."

09 7 / 2014

"I, too, buy into the saying that you can only improve what you measure. The corollary is: when you care about something, when you really commit to it, you have to do your best to track it and improve. Writing is one such skill. You become a writer by writing more, and you can shift your identity consciously to make this change stick."

09 7 / 2014

If this resonates, you might want to follow #GetYourManuscriptOut (started by @raulpacheco, @shawpsych, and @miremara)
Details here
(via Twitter / AcademicBatgirl: Pareto’s Principle. It’s why …)

If this resonates, you might want to follow #GetYourManuscriptOut (started by @raulpacheco, @shawpsych, and @miremara)

Details here

(via Twitter / AcademicBatgirl: Pareto’s Principle. It’s why …)

08 7 / 2014

"We believe that reflective thinking happens when students do one or more of these fourteen things:

  1. Check the assumptions that inform their actions and judgments
  2. Seek to open themselves to new and unfamiliar perspectives
  3. Attempt intersubjective understanding and perspective taking — trying to understand how another person reasons, understands content, or views knowledge
  4. Make their intuitions and “gut” feelings the focus of study
  5. Study the effects of their actions with a view to changing them
  6. Look for blind spots and omissions in their thinking
  7. Identify what is justified and well grounded in their thinking
  8. Accept and experiment with multiple learning modalities
  9. Value emotional dimensions of their learning as much the purely cognitive
  10. Try to upend their habitual ways of understanding something
  11. Connect their thinking conducted in one domain to thinking in another
  12. Become more aware of their habitual epistemic cognition — the typical ways they judge something to be true
  13. Apply reflective protocols in contextually appropriate ways
  14. Alternate cognitive analysis with an acceptance of an unregulated, unmediated flow of emotions, impulses, institutions and images”

— from Engaging Imagination: Helping Students Become Creative and Reflective Thinkers.  Stephen Brookfield & Alison James. 2014.

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Most of these things aren’t about information literacy, per se, but they’re almost all necessary for information literacy skills and concepts to be meaningful.  You can be the greatest searcher in the world, but if you’re a closed-minded thinker incapable of seeing a world you haven’t experienced, what’s the point.

Actually, I don’t think you can be the world’s greatest searcher if you’re closed-minded thinker incapable of seeing a world you haven’t experienced.  So scratch that.

08 7 / 2014

"Engaging Imagination is the companion site for our book Engaging Imagination: Helping Students Become Creative and Reflective Thinkers, a little corner of cyberspace for discussing how to develop imaginative and creative pedagogies, and a blog on these (and other subjects)."

08 7 / 2014

"

This one deserves a “wow.”

SAGE Publishers is retracting 60 articles from the Journal of Vibration and Control after an investigation revealed a “peer review and citation ring” involving a professor in Taiwan.

"

08 7 / 2014

"To be brief and snarky, we’re asking a silly question about the wrong version of the Declaration. In 1776, very few people would have given much thought to which punctuation mark was in that particular location, nor would they have been particularly bothered by the variety. But they also wouldn’t have had much idea at all that there was a parchment version that later generations would fetishize."